Projects

Gallery

BACKLIT is a cultural organisation, and our work and research often extend out into different areas of interest. Our projects and partners play a key role in informing and developing our programmes, artists and community.

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    OUTCOME

    In 2022, BACKLIT introduced OUTCOME. OUTCOME is a creative residency programme that brings students from The University of Nottingham and Nottingham Trent University together for the first time in BACKLIT studios and online.
  • Backlit Hart

    BACKLIT + HART Gallery

    Partnering with HART Galery, Hong Kong, on the Peer to Peer: UK/HK programme, BACKLIT and HART artists Millie Quick, Tom Ireland and Nicholas Wong are developing and collaborating on new works as part of this cultural exchange.
  • Are You Even Listening?

    Are You Even Listening?

    In 2021, BACKLIT created a young people-led podcast series that platforms marginalised perspectives, individual experiences, and opinions on issues spanning the complex socio-political spectrum — Are You Even Listening? Developed by Assistant Curator, Jazz Swali.
  • The Remark

    The Remark

    In 2017/2018, BACKLIT developed a programme titled Introduction to Art-Writing. A series of workshops to bring together people in Nottingham. With continued support from ArtReview, BACKLIT has created an independent online platform, The Remark, that continues to celebrate art and cultural experiences through writing.
  • Klara Szafrańska

    NTU + BACKLIT

    Since 2019, Nottingham Trent University MFA students have been a part of the BACKLIT studios and hosting yearly exhibitions and events in our galleries. This ongoing partnership aims to promote student artists, give a prominent city-centre studio location, host exhibitions and events and support the overall development of artists and arts ecology in the region.
  • Projects + Partners

    The Nottingham Asylum Project

    In 2021, BACKLIT presented a year-long research project on the history of King Edward Park, Sneinton, Nottingham, the site of the UK’s first county asylum, 1812. The project showcased community research, artist commissions and an online resource.